Science Snap (#34) – Kick ’em Jenny

Kick ’em Jenny is a submarine volcano located 8km to the north of the Caribbean island of Grenada. It lies close to the small, uninhabited volcanic islands of Ronde, Diamond, Ill Caille and Les Tantes, though no physical evidence of the volcano is evident from land. At least twelve recorded eruptions have occurred since Kick […]

DSC_0500

Alumnus profile #6 – Dr Sam Engwell

Dr Sam Engwell Marie Curie Early Stage Researcher, INGV PhD title “Dynamics and Deposits of Large Explosive Eruptions”     1) The Twitter Challenge: Describe your PhD in 140 characters Investigation of eruption processes during supereruptions by analysis of deposits in deep-sea sediments.

Ontake

Phreatic eruptions – the silent assasins

The recent eruption of Mt Ontake, Japan tragically killed at least 50 hikers who were on the volcano at the time. Within hours of the eruption taking place, social media was flooded with first-hand video footage illustrating just how close many survivors came to perishing in an onrushing pyroclastic flow. Despite having a sophisticated seismic […]

Mammatus_MSH

Science snap (#31): Mammatus clouds

After all the thunderous weather this weekend and being British, I thought I’d do a weather themed science snap. Don’t bolt yet; it’s a volcanic-weather themed! This is a picture of mammatus clouds following the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. These clouds are pretty rare, unusual and distinctive. Formally, the Glossary of Meteorology […]

Review of the BGS myVolcano iPhone app

Originally posted on the EGU blog network A few months ago, Elspeth posted a review of her top geology-themed mobile phone apps. Since then, the resourceful folk at the British Geological Survey (BGS) have come up with a new contender; here we take a look at myVolcano.

Alumnus profile #5 – Dr. Duncan Muir

Originally posted on the EGU blog network Dr Duncan Muir Post-doctoral research assistant, Uppsala University PhD title “Investigating Magma Storage Conditions at Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia”  

Life and death, and money

The recent tragedy at Sinabung volcano, Indonesia, bought some interesting thoughts to light amongst some members of the volcanology group at Bristol. There were comments regarding the decision by the authorities to allow people to return to their homes (you can see James Hickey’s perspective here). In an ideal world, I’m sure we are all […]

Science Snap (8): White Island erupts!

Originally posted on the EGU blog network White Island is a small volcano roughly 30 miles off the coast of the Bay of Plenty in New Zealand. It is part of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, which is also home to the impressive Lake Taupo, a flooded caldera that formed in an eruption (a ‘super-eruption’ if you […]

Science Snap (3): Earth’s biggest volcano?

The newly discovered submarine Tamu Massif (pictured below), approximately 1500 km east of Japan, has been proposed as the world’s largest volcano. At ~450 km x 650 km it dwarfs Mauna Loa of Hawaii by a factor of 50 in its spatial extent, and is comparable in size to Olympus Mons on Mars (as well […]

The Cascades: A carbonate geochemist’s point of view

Originally posted on the EGU blog network Recently, I was lucky enough to visit a fellow Bristol Earth Sciences PhD student in Vancouver, Washington for a weekend of volcano-spotting (and hiking) in the Cascades. As a non-volcanologist, I was just excited to get some fresh air, good weather and great company for a few days […]