Photo credit: Jon Law

HGVs – Henceforth Gas Vehicles?

This post was inspired by my recent attendance at the ADBA UK Biomethane & Gas Vehicle conference. You may not own or drive a car, but it is almost inevitable that part of your day-to-day your is delivered by heavy goods vehicle (HGV). That Amazon parcel, the food you bought in the supermarket, the pint […]

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Coral, wanted dead and alive; a brief excursion into the world of coral science

Today we have a guest post from Dr. Peter Tomiak who delves into the life and death of corals… I completed my undergraduate degree in Biology and Geology at the University of Bristol in 2008. Subsequently I undertook a sponsored internship with Save The Elephants, in Samburu National Park Kenya, before starting a short term position alongside Prof. Adrian Lister at […]

Yanley Landfill

Plastic packaging – a horror film

Zero Waste Week is an opportunity to reduce landfill waste & save money. In its seventh year, the week runs 1st – 7th September 2014. The theme is “One More Thing” – what one more thing could YOU do? Find out more at http://www.zerowasteweek.co.uk/ or on Twitter using #zerowasteweek Ever since I spent a summer […]

Mammatus_MSH

Science snap (#31): Mammatus clouds

After all the thunderous weather this weekend and being British, I thought I’d do a weather themed science snap. Don’t bolt yet; it’s a volcanic-weather themed! This is a picture of mammatus clouds following the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. These clouds are pretty rare, unusual and distinctive. Formally, the Glossary of Meteorology […]

Aust cliff, near the Severn Bridge in south Gloucestershire. Photo credit: Charly Stamper

Science Snap (#30): Aust Cliff, Gloucestershire

One of the most fascinating things about geology is its ability to reveal global events from evidence contained within a single outcrop. The cliff exposure at Aust in Gloucestershire, UK, is a spectacularly colourful example of this. Located beneath the original Severn Bridge, and running alongside the Severn Estuary, the 40m tall rock face records […]

Science Snap (#29): African Fairy Circles

Originally posted on the EGU blog network If you’re wandering among the arid desert that stretches from Angola to South Africa, you may notice the ground pot-marked by millions of circular barren patches. These striking features are known as “Fairy circles”, and can grow up to 15 meters in diameter. Tall grasses often surround these circles, further […]

Aim high, shoot low? UK recycling rates missing the target

Originally posted on the EGU blog network In 2008, the EU set a target for member countries to achieve a 50 % household recycling rate by 2020; last week, an amendment raised this figure to 70 %. The  graph below shows the latest available data for the UK. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist (or […]

Science Snap (#28): The Eye of the Sahara

Originally posted on the EGU blog network Surrounded by thousands of square miles of ubiquitous desert, the “Eye of the Sahara” peers out from the Earth’s surface and at nearly 50 km wide, its easily visible from space too. The “Eye of the Sahara” is known as a Richat Structure, a geological feature consisting of […]

Science Snap (#28): Brandberg Massif, Namibia

Originally posted on the EGU blog network Brandberg Massif is Namibia’s highest mountain, but if you look from above, you’ll notice it’s no ordinary one. Brandberg is a single mass of granite that pierced its way through the Earth’s crust into the Namib Desert. Looking at the Landsat 7 image, Brandberg is a circular dark […]

Review of the BGS myVolcano iPhone app

Originally posted on the EGU blog network A few months ago, Elspeth posted a review of her top geology-themed mobile phone apps. Since then, the resourceful folk at the British Geological Survey (BGS) have come up with a new contender; here we take a look at myVolcano.