Bristol - European Green Capital 2015 and England's first cycling city. Photo credit: Bristol 2015

The year ahead – twenty fift-green?

Firstly, happy New Year from all those at BaR! The start of January always seems to herald a surfeit of navel-gazing blog posts. Therefore, I thought I would attempt to broaden my horizons and consider whether, with only five years to go to meet the 20-20-20 EU climate targets, will 2015 be the greenest year […]

Review of the BGS myVolcano iPhone app

Originally posted on the EGU blog network A few months ago, Elspeth posted a review of her top geology-themed mobile phone apps. Since then, the resourceful folk at the British Geological Survey (BGS) have come up with a new contender; here we take a look at myVolcano.

Life and death, and money

The recent tragedy at Sinabung volcano, Indonesia, bought some interesting thoughts to light amongst some members of the volcanology group at Bristol. There were comments regarding the decision by the authorities to allow people to return to their homes (you can see James Hickey’s perspective here). In an ideal world, I’m sure we are all […]

Science Snap (#18): Tragic Sinabung Eruption

Originally posted on the EGU blog network Last Saturday (1st February 2014) an eruption at Sinabung volcano in Indonesia claimed the lives of 14 people. That death toll has since risen to 16, and could rise further as people battle in hospital with severe burns and other wounds. The volcano has been erupting since September […]

Conference Diaries: VMSG Meeting 2014

Originally posted on the EGU blog network The Volcanic and Magmatic Studies Group (VMSG) is a combined specialist group of the Mineralogical Society of Great Britain & Ireland, and the Geological Society of London. Each year they hold a meeting, alternating the venue between different UK university departments. This year marked the 50th anniversary of […]

“I’m a scientist, get me out of here…!”

Having had just over a week to recover I can finally begin to look back on what were two incredible weeks of “I’m a scientist, get me out here” excitement! To the uninitiated, think academia meets X-Factor in a science communication and outreach fiesta. The premise is simple – school students ask science questions, scientists […]

Abbreviated science

KFC, MTV, BP, BBC, NASA, NHS, UNICEF, FIFA…combinations of letters that are known the world over. These famous examples demonstrate the power of the acronym, a word formed from the initial components of a series of other words. A full list of acronyms used in this post can be found at the bottom. You may […]

Feeling blue: A lesson in perseverance

Originally posted on the EGU Blog Network: http://blogs.egu.eu/bar/2013/08/12/feeling-blue-a-lesson-in-perseverance/. You can also read the Original BBC article or watch the BBC interview with Peter Harrison I think a lot of PhD time is spent searching, either literally or metaphorically; everything from inspiration on a Monday morning to melt inclusions on the SEM late on a Friday […]

Desert Island Books: Elspeth’s turn

It’s my turn to be stranded on a Desert Island where all my worldly possessions have sunk into the deep sea amid a large storm. I can choose just one book, geology themed of course, to take on the rescue boat. Which one should I choose? A short history of nearly everything Bill Bryson This book […]

Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

In the early hours of 6th April 2009, a magnitude 6.3 earthquake hit the city of L’Aquila, Italy. 309 people died and around 20,000 buildings were destroyed. Today, what most people remember isn’t the magnitude of the quake or where exactly L’Aquila is, but rather that six scientists and a government official were put on […]