PhD profile #6 – Sorcha McMahon

Originally posted on the EGU blog network Sorcha McMahon – 3rd year PhD student “New insights into deep mantle melts and the carbonatite-meliliitite connection” 1) The Twitter challenge: Your PhD in 140 characters Investigating how strange igneous rocks called carbonatites may have formed, using both natural samples and high-pressure experiments

PhD profile #5 – James Hickey

James Hickey – 2nd year PhD student “Constraining volcanic unrest with integrated geodetic modelling”   1) The Twitter challenge: Your PhD in 140 characters Modelling the causative processes that incite volcanic unrest at the surface using finite element analysis – aiding hazard forecasting.

PhD profile #4 – Melanie Auker

Melanie Auker – 3rd year PhD student “Volcanic hazard and risk: A numerical approach”     1) The Twitter challenge: Your PhD in 140 characters Using numerical approaches to better understand past, present, and future global volcanic hazard and risk.

PhD profile #3 – KT

KT Cooper – 3rd year PhD student “The development of porosity and permeability in modern carbonate environments: a combined modelling and field work study” 1) The Twitter challenge: Your PhD in 140 characters Measuring and modelling dissolution of modern carbonates (limestone) by monitoring the groundwater biogeochemistry in the Bahamas.

The average Bristol Earth Sci PhD student

Just who are the mysterious creatures who spend their days tucked away in the Wills Memorial Building, beavering away at their computers and in underground labs? I set out to find out the answer to this question using a rigorous and unbiased scientific survey*.

PhD profile #1 – Charly

Charly Stamper – 3rd year PhD student “Differentiation of mantle-derived magmas from beneath Grenada, Lesser Antilles”   1) The Twitter challenge: Your PhD in 140 characters Unravelling the mystery of how magma chambers work by making synthetic replicas of volcanic rocks – Caribbean fieldwork is a bonus!